Quote 28 Aug 32 notes
The police are quick to argue that their use of force is justified, but the real question is not whether something can be justified, but whether it is in fact good. For decades teachers beat children in schools. This was similarly justified, arguing that it was the only way to maintain order in the classroom. Now that the majority of states have passed laws against corporal punishment of children in school, teachers have found other much more effective ways of creating an atmosphere of respect and order without the use of violence. We seem to have learned that lesson with our kids, the lesson that what we once thought was violence “for your own good” was in fact damaging and counter-productive. We seem to have yet to learn that lesson with “good” violence when it comes to the police or guns.
Photo 26 Aug 62 notes azspot:

Matt Bors: Fear of a Black Victim
via AZspot.
Text 25 Aug 385 notes Dear New York Times:

politicalprof:

We do not execute people in the United States because they are “no angel.”

We do not allow the police to summarily execute (e.g., kill on suspicion of committing a crime) people because they are “no angel.”

Why is this complicated?

via Untitled.
Quote 25 Aug 37 notes
We now live in a neo-feudal society. The evidence is undeniable. The indentured servant is now the indebted wage slave.
— David DeGraw (via azspot)
Link 25 Aug 61 notes [social sandbox] visual stories, tools from Knight Lab, structured journalism »

socialmediadesk:

Hello everyone,

I was at NLGJA last week and sat in on a session about visual design. I thought I would pass along some of the interesting takeaways and links.

1. Here’s a list of visual stories that are unique in some way (curated by Gannett designer Tyler…

via NPR.
Quote 25 Aug 52 notes
The silence is deafening. Congressional Republicans won’t increase the minimum wage; they oppose extending unemployment benefits to the millions still without jobs; refuse to repair our crumbling infrastructure (a move that would put tens of thousands to work); won’t invest more in childcare, which working families desperately need; and won’t raise taxes on the top 1 percent even though 95% of all economic gains since the recovery have gone to the top. State Republicans won’t extend Medicaid to the working class, even though the federal government will pay the whole tab for three years and 90 percent thereafter. Yet, despite all this, Democrats are in danger of losing the Senate in the midterm elections, and remaining a minority in the House. This is absurd. Labor Day must mark the start of an aggressive campaign by Democrats to show working Americans whose side they’re on, and whom the Republicans really represent. Otherwise, why have a Democratic party at all? Like
— Robert Reich (via azspot)
Photo 23 Aug 327 notes azspot:

How “Christian” Was Sam Walton, Really?
via AZspot.
Photo 23 Aug 84 notes azspot:

Darrin Bell
via AZspot.
Link 23 Aug 186 notes Some Facts that Poverty-Deniers Don't Want to Hear»

The Economic Policy Institute stated, “The United States stands out as the country with the highest poverty rate and one of the lowest levels of social expenditure.” It’s a national disgrace that we allow just a few people to take more of the country’s wealth than the millions of productive people who can’t find living-wage jobs.

Just two men made more investment income in 2013 than the entire year’s welfare budget (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), commonly referred to as ‘welfare’).

Just 400 individuals made more investment income in 2013 than the entire safety net (SNAP, WIC (Women, Infants, Children), Child Nutrition, Earned Income Tax Credit, Supplemental Security Income, TANF, and Housing).

And the richest 1% made more from their investments in 2013 than the total cost of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and the entire safety net.

via AZspot.
Photo 22 Aug 68 notes emergentfutures:

For the first time, more Americans subscribe to cable internet than cable TV


You can now officially think of American cable companies as internet service providers with a declining side business in television.
At the end of June, the number of people subscribing to broadband internet from the nine largest US cable companies (49,915,000) exceeded the number of television subscribers (49,910,000) for the first time. That’s according to a new tallyby Bruce Leichtman, president of Leichtman Research Group.


Full Story: Quartz

emergentfutures:

For the first time, more Americans subscribe to cable internet than cable TV

You can now officially think of American cable companies as internet service providers with a declining side business in television.

At the end of June, the number of people subscribing to broadband internet from the nine largest US cable companies (49,915,000) exceeded the number of television subscribers (49,910,000) for the first time. That’s according to a new tallyby Bruce Leichtman, president of Leichtman Research Group.

Full Story: Quartz


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